Food importer expands forklift fleet

Food importer expands forklift fleet

A Victorian food importer is poised to double its fleet of forklifts after leasing additional warehouse space to accommodate rapid business growth.

Lloyd Foods, based in Dandenong South (Victoria), supplies the food service industry nationally.

It currently has a 2.5-tonne payload Toyota 8FG25 counter-balance forklift and a two-tonne payload Toyota BT Reflex RRE200 reach forklift.

Director Darren Lloyd said the company has leased an adjoining building and will soon commission more reach trucks to service the increased warehouse area.

“The business has quadrupled in the 18 months we’ve been operating,” Darren Lloyd said.

“The forklifts are flexible and reliable, the service back-up is excellent and our account manager is very responsive to our needs,” he said.

Grant Owen, area sales manager for Toyota Material Handling Australia’s (TMHA) Melbourne branch, said Lloyd Foods uses the gas-powered Toyota 8FG25 forklift primarily to unload and load trucks.

“It is also used to unload containers using a labour-saving slip-sheet attachment, while the BT RRE200 reach truck works in high racking and narrow aisles,” he said.

Lloyd Foods was founded 18 months ago when Darren Lloyd bought an existing food import business in Sydney before renaming it and relocating to Melbourne.

“We currently import 10 containers of food per week, sourcing product from a dozen different countries,” Darren Lloyd said. “It is all shelf-stable product so it is stored dry.”

 

 

 

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