Crude oil found in every backyard

CSIRO and Monash University have developed a chemical process that turns green waste into a stable bio-crude oil,  which can be used to produce high-value chemicals and biofuels, including both petrol and diesel replacement fuels.

"By making changes to the chemical process, we’ve been able to create a concentrated bio-crude which is much more stable than that achieved elsewhere in the world," said Dr Steven Loffler of CSIRO Forest Biosciences.

"This makes it practical and economical to produce bio-crude in local areas for transport to a central refinery, overcoming the high costs and greenhouse gas emissions otherwise involved in transporting bulky green wastes over long distances."

The process uses low value waste such as forest thinnings, crop residues, waste paper and garden waste, significant amounts of which are currently dumped in landfill or burned.

"By using waste, our Furafuel technology overcomes the food versus fuel debate which surrounds biofuels generated from grains, corn and sugar," said Dr Loffler.

"The project forms part of CSIRO’s commitment to delivering cleaner energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions by improving technologies for converting waste biomass to transport fuels."

The plant wastes being targeted for conversion into biofuels contain chemicals known as lignocellulose, which is increasingly favoured around the world as a raw material for the next generation of bio-ethanol.

Lignocellulose is both renewable and potentially greenhouse gas neutral. It is predominantly found in trees and is made up of cellulose; lignin, a natural plastic; and hemicellulose.

CSIRO and Monash University will apply to patent the chemical processes underpinning the conversion of green wastes to bio-crude oil once final laboratory trials are completed.

The research to date is supported by funding from CSIRO’s Energy Transformed Flagship program, Monash University, Circa Group and Forest Wood Products Australia.

Read more at www.csiro.au/science/ps3vf.html. A podcast is also available at www.csiro.au/multimedia/OilFromRubbishPodcast.html.

Photo: Waste paper is a potential source of fuels (CSIRO)

You may also like to read:


, , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Newsletter

Sign up with your business email address to keep up with the latest industry news from T&L. Newsletter sent every week.

Most Read

Retail rises 0.3% in March
Australian retail turnover rose 0.3 per cent in March 2019, ...
Robots in distribution centres – from MHD magazine
Mal Walker Don’t worry, contrary to the terrifying Daleks...
Uber Freight gets the SAP boost
SAP and Uber Freight have announced a partnership to moderni...
Supply Chain Climate Change Solutions Summit and Expo
In recognition that people in industry learn from successful...

Supported By